Ealing Council Unitary Development Plan
   
Chapter 3 - GREEN SPACE AND THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT
   
 
3.1 Major Open Areas (MOAs) - Metropolitan Open Land and Green Belt   3.5 Land for Sports, Children's Play and Informal Recreation
3.2 Green Corridors and the Waterway network   3.6 Allotments
3.3 Heritage Land   3.7 Burial Land
3.4 Public and Community Open Space   3.8 Biodiversity and Nature Conservation
      3.9 Wildlife Protection
   
 

This chapter deals with planning for the public, private and community open spaces, outdoor activities, nature conservation and issues which are critical to the amenity and natural environment of the Borough.3.Int1

 

The policy context for this chapter of the Plan for the Environment was set by the government's Urban White Paper and Regional Planning Guidance for South East England, and by planning policy guidance on Green Belts, Nature Conservation, and Sport, Open Space & and Recreation (PPG 2, PPG 9, draft PPS 9 and PPG 17). In addition the Greater London Authority's (GLA) London Plan and the Mayor's Biodiversity Strategy outlines the policy directions proposed by the Mayor of London.3.Int2

   
  These raise a number of key issues that need to be taken into account in this chapter.:
 
  • Green Belt, Metropolitan Open Land and locally important open space, including Green Corridors and other wildlife habitats should be protected. The Greater London Authority's London Plan clearly support networks of strategic open spaces and walking routes, such as 'green chains', and improved access to and connections between, elements throughout the network. The problem of expectations of public access to these corridors needs to be addressed, given that in some instances sections of these open areas are part of private developments.
  • New open spaces should be created where there is inadequate provision, and the improvement of existing open spaces should be encouraged.
  • The prospect of increased residential densities implies a greater strain on existing open/recreational space, in terms of its capacity and intensification of usage. Higher densities of urban development would will mean that it is even more important to protect and enhance green space in urban areas.
  • The south - east region's biodiversity should be maintained, protected and enhanced, with positive actions to achieve the targets set in national and local biodiversity action plans through planning decisions and other measures. The London Plan requires the identification and protection of wildlife sites through the procedures adopted by the Mayor in his Biodiversity Strategy.
  • Priority should be given to protecting areas designated for their intrinsic nature conservation value, their landscape quality, or their cultural importance. Important species should be protected and public access to nature promoted. The London Plan will identify and protect important sites for nature conservation,which and grades sites into three categories: - sites of metropolitan, borough and local significance.
  • Burial space in London is limited. Provision should be made in a way that respects cultural and religious preferences and environmental and land uses constraints; while at the same time contributing to sustainable land use, avoiding loss of open space and important habitats.            3.Int3
   
 

This chapter brings together policies that address these issues and contribute to global sustainability, and the protection, enhancement and management of the range of public and other green spaces and nature conservation interests in the Borough, for the present and into the future.3.Int4

   
  The strategic Policy 1.3 (as set out in chapter one) is -
   

To maintain the system of Major Open Areas linked by Green Corridors; to protect green space in Ealing; to foster biodiversity and nature conservation; to provide new outdoor recreation opportunities in areas of need; and to improve open space wherever possible.*

   

*DCLG Direction 2007: this policy not saved. See Appendix.

   
 

There are nine policies for Green Space and the Natural Environment, and these, together with their justifications, are set out on the subsequent pages of this chapter.

   
  Policies for Green Space and the Natural Environment
 

3.1  Major Open Areas (MOAs) - Metropolitan Open Land and Green Belt

  1.

The Council will:

    (i)

Seek to retain, improve and enhance the open character of and access to, Major Open Areas, including improved networks for footpaths and cycle-paths;

    (ii)

Encourage the positive use and management of individual parts of the Major Open Areas that respects their open nature, character and biodiversity role, to meet the need for open air leisure, sport and recreation;

    (iii) Permit only appropriate and essential developments required for open-air recreation, nature conservation, nature education, agriculture and forestry, which conserve and enhance the Major Open Area.
  2.

Any development acceptable in Major Open Areas should:

    (i)

Be of a small scale, and a height and design sympathetic to its setting in a Major Open Area;

    (ii)

Not damage the landscape, openness and natural character of the area; and

    (iii) Provide environmental improvements on adjacent or another appropriate land.
  3.

Outdoor advertising will not normally be permitted in Green Belt or Metropolitan Open Land, or where it would impact on these areas. If necessary these areas will be considered for designation as areas of special advertisement control.

  4.

Development adjacent to Major Open Areas should not prejudice their purpose, sense of openness or environmental character.

  5.

No development will be permitted in the Brent River Park that detracts from its landscape, nature conservation or hydrological roles.

       
  2004 Plan
See Map Sheet 2,
Table 3A - Development Adjacent to MOAs, Table 3B - River and Waterway Corridors
  Govt Documents
PPG 2 Green Belts, PPS 9 Biodiversity and Geological Conservation, PPG 17 Planning for Open Space, Sport and Recreation, PPS 25 Development and Flood Risk
 

The London Plan 2008
3D.9 – 3D.10

   
  There are 19 Major Open Areas (MOAs) in Ealing shown on the proposals map, which are protected as Green Belt (whose function is set out in paragraph 1.5 of PPG 2) and Metropolitan Open Land (The London Plan, Policy 3D.9). The primary function of the Green Belt is to check unrestricted sprawl. Once designated as Green Belt, this land can fulfil other objectives, including providing opportunities for recreation and nature conservation. MOL is a London wide concept and is recognised as land which contributes to the physical structure of London, provides opportunities for open air recreation, or contains features or landscape of metropolitan or national significance. Whilst the criteria for identifying Green Belt and MOL are distinct, The London Plan (paragraphs 3.248-3.249) confirms that the principles of control over development in the Green Belt set out in PPG 2 equally applies to MOL. In this regard a presumption is established against inappropriate development within the Green Belt and MOL which would be harmful to the open character of the land. Competing pressure in MOA's for development and different uses of land, can mean that conflict arises.3.1-J1
 

The Council will resist development in MOAs and seek to improve access. No development is likely to be permitted other than limited, small scale and sensitively designed buildings or works, needed to support the management or enjoyment of recreation and leisure facilities. The Council will seek environmental improvements on adjacent or other appropriate land to secure the enhancement of MOAs, consolidate their landscape and visual amenity value and public access and improve recreational facilities and public access.3.1-J2

  Inappropriate development will not be permitted merely because the land has become unused or derelict, and infilling will not be considered a justification for development. 3.1-J3
 
TABLE 3A

Development Adjacent to Metropolitan Open Areas

 
 

 

1.

Any development must respect the style and character of the surrounding area. Any buildings or extensions should be small scale, with sensitive boundary treatment, and not destroy the open character of the area.

2.

All existing healthy trees of amenity value on the proposed site will be retained and protected by tree preservation orders.

3.

A 5m landscape strip including appropriate trees, hedges and shrubs shall be provided on land immediately adjoining the MOA, where required by the Council.

4.

Development of adjoining land should be complementary to the amenity of MOA, including education or community buildings attached to playing fields and residential development linked to amenity open space.

5.

Development which extends the general boundary of the present built-up area into open land or along highways will not be permitted.

6.

Any development should not make adjacent areas of MOA less defensible against further encroachment.

7.

Where sites adjacent to MOA are in commercial use, the Council will, where appropriate, seek relevant agreements related to the open space when considering development.

8.

Where high security fences are required, these must be adequately screened.

 
   
 

Positive action will be taken to improve the character of those areas of MOL that have deteriorated. This will include initiating schemes with private sector finance or other appropriate funding, and taking opportunities for the purchase or management of land, for example, from highway works or along the Grand Union Canal.3.1-J4

  The Brent River Park is a special area of Metropolitan Open Land and Public Open Space, in the very heart of the borough. It acts not only as amenity land, but also as a flood plain assisting in flood control. Development in the flood plain would lessen the effectiveness of the flood alleviation scheme, and cause flooding of properties. It would also seriously detract from the open character, nature conservation value and amenity of the park. The Council will control development, and manage the Brent River Park on the basis of principles set out in the Sites and Areas Chapter in Schedule 10.2. This table refers to all other land designated as MOA's.3.1-J5
 

3.2  Green Corridors and the Waterway Network

  1.

The Council will not normally permit development within Green Corridors, and development adjoining or affecting the setting of these corridors will be expected to enhance their visual, nature conservation and recreational qualities, and their visual and environmental continuity.

  2. The Council will promote the environmental and amenity aspects of the Green Corridors along the Grand Union Canal, and land along the river corridors of the Borough.
  3. The Council will not permit development that would have an adverse impact on the water environment, particularly in relation to canals, rivers, ponds, wetlands, public access in river corridors and water related recreation; or which would result in any adverse changes in the flows or levels in any watercourses in the vicinity, or the quality of surface or underground water.
       
 

2004 Plan
See Map Sheet 2,
Sites and Areas Schedule 10.3, Table 3B - River and Waterway Corridors

 

SPG/SPD
SPG 22 A40 Acton: Green Corridor Strategy

 

Govt Documents
PPS 9 Biodiversity and Geological Conservation; PPG 17 Planning for Open Space, Sport and Recreation; PPS 25 Development and Flood Risk

 

The London Plan 2008
3D.10, 4A.17, 4C.1 – 34.

   
 

Green Corridors provide important links, between networks of strategic open spaces providing environmental, recreational and infrastructure facilities. They comprise roads, railways, walking and cycle routes, and corridors for the movement of wildlife, as well as green landmarks in their own right. Consequently, there will be little scope for development in Green Corridors, although limited opportunities within the newly defined A40 Acton Green Corridor in the eastern part of the borough will be assessed in the context of proposed revised Supplementary Guidance, and development adjoining these corridors will be expected to enhance their quality and continuity. The Council will seek to enhance the visual and environmental continuity between open areas, by planting and landscaping schemes and nature conservation management. Where feasible, footpaths and cyclepaths will be incorporated.3.2-J1

  The Grand Union Canal is a waterway which functions as an unbroken Green Corridor and pedestrian link through the borough.and tThe Council will promote its use for recreation, leisure and nature conservation, and encourage improvements. There are 10 miles of canals in the Borough, and together with the Rivers Brent and Crane and smaller rivers and streams, these waterways form an integral part of the Green Corridors in the Borough. Railway and major road arteries also have valuable Green Corridor functions, and some operational development may need to proceed along railway lines, to support their primary transport function. 3.2-J2
 
TABLE 3B

River and Waterway Network

 

The Council will seek (in consultation with the Environment Agency and British Waterways or other owners and agencies as appropriate) to promote the environmental and amenity aspects of river corridors and the Grand Union Canal by:

 

 

i)

Conserving existing areas of value within waterway corridors and wherever possible seeking to restore and improve the natural elements of the water environment, especially where there is new development;, ensuring that planting, landscaping and conservation management schemes are included;

ii)

Where appropriate promoting public access to waterway corridors and improvinge access along and to the towpath;

iii)

Identifying appropriate locations for water related recreation along river corridors;

iv)

Retaining canal-side uses that are commercially related to the canal;

v)

Resisting the loss of any water space;

vi)

Facilitating and encouraging the retention and restoration of historic or traditional canal buildings or features;

vii)

Encouraging recreational moorings at selected sites;

viii)

Considering suitable sites for residential moorings within predominantly residential areas, where there is ready access to shops, public transport, schools and other facilities, and no undue harm to the amenity of canal residents, users or access along the towpath;

ix)

Encouraging passenger use of the canal especially for leisure and tourist activity;

x)

Giving weight to London Canals Committee's design and guidance when considering development proposals affecting or adjoining the canal, in consultation with British Waterways;

xi)

Supporting and promoting initiatives which will result in improvements to water quality;

xii) Not permitting the culverting of watercourses and encouraginge de-culverting.

 
 

3.3  Heritage Land

  1.

Development will not be permitted on Heritage Land unless it would preserve or enhance the special character, landscape and planting of the Heritage Land. The sites designated as Heritage Land include Walpole Park, Pitshanger Manor, Osterley Park and Twyford Abbey.

  2.

Existing footpath access to Heritage Land will be conserved and additional access sought.

  3. Other comparable land of historic value will be similarly protected.
       
  2004 Plan
See Sites and Areas
Schedule 10.4 Heritage Land
 

Govt Documents
PPG 15 Planning and the Historic Environment

  The London Plan 2008
Policy 4B.12
   
  This policy extends the range of open space policies in the UDP to include the protection of open space, gardens and landscapes of heritage value. Heritage Land of particular historic significance may be listed on English Heritage's 'Gardens of Special Historic Interest Register'. Within Ealing; Walpole Park, Pitshanger Manor and Osterley Park are already registered. Whilst Twyford Abbey is not currently registered by English Heritage, the aspirations for this site are that its heritage value is fully restored so that the site would be capable of being registered as a 'Historic Park and Garden'. Development on Heritage land that will have an adverse affect on the site, setting or enjoyment of any part of its grounds will not normally be permitted. The Council will also keep under review other comparable open areas identified as being of heritage value, and a similar approach will be promoted, which will seek voluntary co-operation for conservation and enhancement'.3.3-J1
 

3.4  Public and Community Open Space

  1.

The loss of Public or Community Open Space, as defined on the proposals map, will not be permitted unless the development is directly related to the open space use of the land and any development of adjoining land should preserve or enhance the open character thereof.

  2.

The Council will seek improved access to Public and Community Open Space and will establish additional Public and Community Open Space, particularly in areas where there is a deficiency in open space provision.

  3.

Development directly related to the purposes of Public and Community Open Space and which accords with their open character, will be permitted. Acceptable uses include nature areas, playing fields, allotments, amenity space, children's play areas and other open recreational uses.

  4. Suitable arts, cultural and entertainment uses of open space will be encouraged.
       
 

2004 Plan
See Table 3D - Open Space Definitions,
Map Sheets 2, 3 and 4, Sites and Areas Schedules 10.5 and 10.6,Policy 3.3 and Table 3C - Development Criteria

 

SPG/SPD
SPG 7 Accessible Ealing
SPD 2 Community Facilities
SPD 5 Twyford Avenue Community Open Space

 

Govt Documents
PPG 17 Planning for Open Space, Sport and Recreation

 

The London Plan 2008
Policies 3D.8 – 3D.11. Also, Mayor’s SPG - Providing for Children and Young People’s Play and Informal Recreation

 

Other Documents
The Mayor's Culture Strategy;
Ealing's Community Strategy, Chapter 5

   
 

The Borough contains long established parks and other open spaces with public access. There is also a range of Community Open Spaces, in the form of playing fields, allotments, cemeteries and other green areas with more limited access to specific user groups. These areas also have a recreation function, make a visual contribution to the street scene, and may have nature conservation value.3.4-J1

 

The Council recognises the importance of preserving, increasing and enhancing the amount of open space for leisure, education, and recreation and conservation activities, particularly in areas where there is a deficiency. The cCouncil's intention is to designate, protect and where possible enhance public and community open space, promoting positive use and accessibility for all sectors of the population.3.4-J2

 

Development may need to be resisted, and development of sites adjacent to Open Space will be controlled to make sure that it preserves and enhances its open character. Community Open Space is protected for the benefit of the community. Development will only be permitted if it accords with the strict exceptions laid down in Policy 3.4 and Table 3C, where it is needed for the recreational use of the site, and does not change its essential open character and setting.3.4-J3

  Open space also has value for cultural activities, and plays an important social role where different ethnic and cultural groups can meet, as well as families and friends. It is the aim of the Council to address areas of open space deficiency, but also to improve access to existing open space by all sections of the community. This will normally be achieved by planning obligation agreements, and these will also include:
  i)

Gardens with textured and scented plants for the visually impaired;

  ii)

Raised plots for elderly or disabled people and space for activity for small children where appropriate;

  iii)

Access for wheelchairs and pushchairs;

  iv)

Accessible nature conservation or heritage trails;

  v)

Sports activities for both spectators and participants and appropriate sports facilities

  vi) Play space and equipment for children and teenagers.3.4-J4
 
TABLE 3C

Development in and adjoining Public and Community Open Spaces

 

In order to maintain and enhance access to Public Open Space, and establish additional Public and Community Open Space as needs, opportunities and resources allow, the Council will:

 

 

i)

Refuse undue intensification of recreation use which would diminish the value of space contributing to informal recreational needs such as sitting out, walking or nature conservation;

ii)

Encourage privately owned, vacant or underused sites will be encouraged to allow, and opportunities will be sought, for public access;

iii)

Seek additional open space within new developments in areas where there is a deficiency;

iv)

Promote community use of educational playing fields and privately owned open spaces;

v)

Encourage proposals to make these open spaces fully accessible for people with disabilities;

vi)

Improve safety, access, nature conservation, and public conveniences where appropriate;

vii)

Ensure development adjacent to existing open space will preserve and enhance the open character by:

 

  • Avoiding shadow, blocking views with high-rise buildings, or creating wind flow problems,
  • Contributing to improved access for pedestrians,
  • Avoiding sub-division of any green space to create vehicular access; and
viii) Seek to create views and open aspects while retaining any existing trees and planting on land adjoining the park.

 
 
Table 3D
Public and Community Open Space - Definitions

Type

Main Function

Approx Size

Distance from Home

Characteristics

a)  Regional parks and open spaces (linked Major Open Land and Green Belt corridors)

Weekend and occasional visits by car, cycle or public transport

400ha (990 acres)

-

Large areas and corridors of commons, woodlands and parkland, including areas not publicly accessible but which contribute to the overall amenity, providing for informal recreation with some non-intensive active recreational use.

b)  Metropolitan Park

Weekend and occasional visits by cycle, car or public transport

60.7ha

(150 acres)

2 miles

(3.2 km) or more where park is appre-ciably larger

Either i) natural heathland commons, woodland, etc;

or ii) formal parks providing both active and passive recreation, eg boating, entertainment, leisure facilities for the family, etc., may contain playing fields, but at least 100 acres for other pursuits including nature and landscape conservation. Adequate car parking, disabled access and cycle provision essential.

c)  District Park

Weekend and occasional visits on foot, cycle, car or public transport

0.75 miles

(1.2 km)

Containing playing fields, but at least 30 acres for other pursuits (as in local parks) and some car parking.

d)  Local Park

For pedestrian visitors including nearby workers

5 acres

(2ha) 

0.25 miles

(400m) or less

Providing for court games, children's play for different age groups including play centres and adventure playgrounds, sitting out areas, including nature and landscape conservation, landscaped environment and disabled access; and playing fields if the parks are large enough.

e)  Small Local Park

Pedestrian visits especially by old people, children and workers at mid-day; particularly valuable in high density areas

0.25 miles (400m) or less

Gardens, sitting-out areas, children's playgrounds and disabled access. Local pockets managed for nature and landscape conservation that could include seating or play areas.

f)   Community Open Space

As above and in areas where there is a deficiency of public open space

0.25 miles

(400m)

or less

Acceptable uses include nature areas,

playing fields, allotments, amenity space, children's play areas and other open recreational uses retained for the benefit of the community, with uses agreed and maintained through community involvement.

 

3.5  Land for Sports, Children's Play and Informal Recreation

  1.

The Council will protect green space needed for playing fields and other open recreational activities. Development other than for open space use will not be permitted if the proposal would remove a sports facility which could not readily be replaced in the locality, or would cause or perpetuate a local deficiency;

  2.

Proposals for facilities ancillary to outdoor recreation including hard/ artificial sports pitches, club houses, changing accommodation, and car parks,will be permitted if they are consistent with the open character and appearance of the green space in question;

  3.

Proposals for golf courses and driving ranges will only be permitted where they do not compromise the openness of the site, the quality of the green space and the amenity of the neighbouring residents. Close attention in this regard will be paid to any proposed floodlighting and boundary treatment. Development should also facilitate access by public transport and other non car modes;

  4.

The Council will seek to ensure the provision of safe children's play facilities in connection with new development, especially in areas of play facility deficiency. Community based adventure playgrounds and opportunities for imaginative play will also be encouraged; and

  5. Development involving intensification of recreational use of open space will be resisted where the land positively contributes to informal recreational needs (e.g. sitting out, walking, viewing a landscaped or nature conservation area).
       
 

2004 Plan
See Table 3E, Table 3F

  SPG/SPD
SPG 7 Accessible Ealing
SPD 2 Community Facilities
SPD 5 Twyford Avenue Community Open Space
  Govt Documents
PPG 17 Planning for Open Space, Sport and Recreation
 

The London Plan 2008
Policy 3D.8 – 3D.13. Also, Mayor’s SPG - Providing for Children and Young People’s Play and Informal Recreation

 

Other Documents
The Protection of School Playing Fields and Land for City Academies, DfES (2001);
National Playing Fields Association (NPFA) '6 acre' Standards;
Ealing's Community Strategy, Chapter 6;

   
 

The provision of outdoor recreation (including educational playing fields, golf courses and golf driving ranges and open air entertainment) is an essential element of Ealing's social infrastructure for all age groups, and plays a large part in providing facilities and positive activities for young people. Of particular importance is the provision of safe children's play facilities in connection with new developments. Their location will need to maximise the use of non - car transport, as per PPG 13 'Transport' and Council policies.3.5-J1

 

The Council will resist development of open spaces including club or education playing fields, particularly where the development would remove sports and recreation facilities of a quality or potential which could not easily be replaced within the locality, and cause the loss of strategic or local amenity.3.5-J2

 

Ancillary facilities to outdoor recreation uses, such as hard/artificial sports pitches, club houses, changing accommodation and car parking, can result in an effective loss of open space. Proposals should also minimise nuisance to nearby residents; avoid significant loss of the open facilities where they are situated; protect any recognised or potential nature value of the land; and secure the most sustainable location available in terms of non - car modes of transport;, in accordance with the criteria in Table 3E below.3.5-J3

  Golf courses normally occupy extensive tracts of open land, and their need for uninterrupted passage and play must be set against landscape and nature conservation principles. Golf driving ranges pose particular problems in terms of boundary fencing and protection, and evening use with floodlighting. Golf uses will therefore also need to satisfy appropriate criteria as set out in Table 3E.3.5-J4
 
TABLE 3E

Outdoor Recreation Facilities - Criteria for Approval

 

 

1.

The openness of the site should not be compromised;

2.

The proportion of buildings and hard surfaced areas on the site is not materially increased (whether by individual proposals or cumulatively), and buildings and hard surfaces should be small scale in relation to the size of the area of open land;

3.

The site is large enough to accommodate the hard/ artificial surfaced areas or additional facilities away from housing and other sensitive uses, with adequate landscaping to prevent any possible future nuisance and to compensate for loss of green space;

4.

Any fencing, and lighting columns, should be designed as slender structures, of minimum height needed to provide reasonable security and adequate lighting, avoiding light spillage and having regard to the design criteria in Policy 4.12;

5.

Ancillary uses should be located where there is easy access to a choice of public transport;

6.

Where larger facilities are proposed, sites should be located near a choice of travel modes;

7.

Good access, particularly for public transport, and prevention of any undesirable increase in road traffic;

8.

Public access by footpaths and bridle paths is ensured, which have adequate signing and space to avoid the need for protective fencing;

9.

Agricultural land, of historic value, that forms part or has recently formed part of a farm unit is protected;

10.

Areas important for their landscape and nature conservation value are protected;

11.

Provision in areas of open space of poor landscape/visual value is encouraged, that would result in a substantial improvement in the landscape;

12.

The proposed facilities are in character with the surrounding area;

13. An environmental impact assessment for developments of over 1 hectare should be undertaken.

 
   
 

Policy 3.5 (part 4) aims to improve the provision of play space within housing areas, and to encourage suitable location and design so that children have an opportunity to play near their homes, without immediately creating conflict with neighbours. Adequate and varied provision is needed, or older children will use what little space is available, confining other children to their homes or to small gardens only big enough for toddler play. Provision for a wide age range enables older siblings to supervise younger ones. Many parts of the Borough are not within easy walking distance of a park. The walk along busy roads, playing unsupervised at some distance from home and the fouling by dogs of public parks can all deter children from using parks, or parents from allowing them to go alone. Supervised play centres are a valuable alternative to play facilities near the home.3.5-J5

  In locations where high densities leave little space for children to play, facilities could be provided in a nearby park or open space. This is normally acceptable only for smaller residential schemes (1 acre or under) and where access to the park is easy and reasonably safe. In areas of low density housing with larger gardens, provision to at least minimum standards is necessary to give children the opportunity of meeting and mixing with other children; of gaining access to a wider range of play facilities; and giving parents and children opportunities for social development. The Council supports the NPFA recommendation that higher density areas should exceed their numerical standard (see below).3.5-J6
 
TABLE 3F

National Playing Field Association Targets for Playspace

 

 

The NPFA recommends a minimum standard for outdoor playing space of 2.4 hectares (6 acres) for 1,000 people.

 

This overall standard is divided into 1.6 hectares (4 acres) for outdoor sport and 0.8 hectares (2 acres) for children's play.

 

Within the standard for outdoor sport is a specific allocation of 1.2 hectares (3 acres) for pitch sports and 0.4 hectares for non pitch sports (e.g. athletics, tennis, bowls and croquet).

 

For children's play, the recommendation is to achieve 0.8 hectares (2 acres) of outdoor playing spaces provided by designated areas;, containing a range of facilities in locations based upon walking time, and providing the balance as casual playing within areas of amenity space.

 

 
 

3.6  Allotments

  1.

The Council will safeguard allotment sites and seek opportunities for improved provision, having regard to the need to maintain provision in the Borough, and the constraints on disposal. Where allotments are no longer fully used, the Council will encourage the provision of facilities to attract different sections of the community

  2. If it is necessary for allotment use to cease, the preferred alternative uses will be public open space if there is no alternative open space within 400 metres, or alternative community use of an open space nature, including informal open space or areas for nature conservation.
       
 

Govt Documents
PPG 17 Planning for Open Space, Sport and Recreation

 

Other Documents
LBE Allotment Strategy;
'Growing in the Community - A good practice guide for the management of allotments' (2001) (LGA & GLA)

   
  The Council is committed to safeguarding sites for allotments. If allotments are not fully in use, and it is not possible to generate greater local interest, alternative priorities would be other public or community open space, for example children's play areas. 3.6-J1
 

3.7  Burial Land

 

Any proposals for new space for burials or cremations will require an attractive landscape setting with an adequate area, in a convenient, accessible location without loss of:

  (i)

Open air recreation or sports facilities;

  (ii)

Nature conservation value, especially defined sites;

  (iii)

Special features such as hedges; and

  (iv) Buildings or features of architectural, historic or landscape importance.
       
 

The London Plan 2008
Policy 3D.19

 

Other Documents
Burial Space Needs in London (LPAC, 1997)

   
 

Land for burials or other funeral remains is increasingly scarce. The plan seeks to recognise this need, although existing areas for burial within burial land reserves in the Borough are expected to last for 20 years, and accommodate requirements for green burials.3.7-J1

  A burial on private land within the curtilage of a dwelling house does not require planning permission, provided the grave is unmarked and does not change the use or character of the curtilage. It does however, require registration. 3.7-J2
 

3.8  Biodiversity and Nature Conservation

  1.

The Council will protect landscape features, both in the built-up area and on open land, which are affected by development; and will promote conservation and enhancement of important features of the natural environment such as ancient habitats¹, river flood plains, woodland, canals and other locally important habitats.

  2.

No development will normally be permitted within the following areas, except for facilities for nature conservation:

    (i)

Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI)

    (ii)

Local Nature Reserves (LNR)

    (iii)

Sites of Metropolitan Importance for Nature Conservation (SMI)

    (iv) Sites of Interest for Nature Conservation (SINCs)
  3. Within Nature Conservation Management Areas, the Council will seek to protect and promote nature conservation in conjunction with existing open space uses, through the development of integrated management plans
   
 

2004 Plan
See Map Sheet 5
Sites and Areas Schedule 10.7

 

Govt Documents
PPS 9 Biodiversity and Geological Conservation

 

The London Plan 2008
Policy 3D.9

 

Other Documents
London Ecology Unit: Nature Conservation in Ealing (1991);
Ealing's Community Strategy, Chapter 5;
Mayor's Biodiversity Strategy for London;
Ealing Biodiversity Action Plan

   
  ¹ Defined as surviving and non-recreatable parts of the historic landscape.
   
 

The borough has many attractive green spaces, ranging from countryside areas such as the Green Belt and Horsenden Hill, to small open spaces and back gardens. It also has a wealth of other features from its agricultural heritage, such as ditches, ponds, hedgerows, meadows and woodlands, which are rich in animal and plant species, all of which positively contribute to the diversity of life.  Some of the habitats are ancient and cannot be recreated, and have therefore been listed as a priority for conservation.3.8-J1

 

Development will be resisted on defined sites, to assist in retaining bio-diversity, unless it can be clearly shown that it would not harm the nature conservation interests at the site, and that an ecological evaluation has been satisfactorily completed.  Development adjoining sites must also demonstrate no damage to the amenity and nature conservation interest of the site, and the satisfactory completion of an ecological evaluation.3.8-J2

  Sites of Interest for Nature Conservation (SINCs) are identified in Map Sheet 5 and listed in Table 10.7. Definition of further sites or changes in the area of existing sites will be considered where scientific/ecological evidence supports this. In order to establish linkages between defined sites and thus retain and enhance bio-diversity, wider areas often comprising a number of sites, have been designated as Nature Conservation Management Areas. Within these management areas, nature conservation will be promoted in conjunction with existing uses such as grazing, outdoor recreation, allotments or a cemetery, through the development of integrated management plans.3.8-J3
 

3.9  Wildlife Protection

 

Development and other land use changes will not be permitted which may have an adverse effect on Protected or Priority Species. Where development is permitted which may affect these species, conditions may be imposed or an agreement made to:

  (i)

Minimise disturbance;

  (ii)

Provide alternative habitat capable of sustaining current populations; and

  (iii)

Facilitate the survival of individual members or groups of the species.

   
  Govt Documents
PPS 9 Biodiversity and Geological Conservation
 

The London Plan 2008
Policy 3D.14

 

Other Documents
Refer to Schedule 1, 5 and 8 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended);
Priority Species are defined in the London and Ealing Biodiversity Action Plans;
London Ecology Unit 'Nature Conservation in Ealing' (1991);
Mayor's Biodiversity Strategy for London

   
 

Appreciation of wildlife in cities is growing at a time when natural habitats are threatened by urban development.;Tthe protection and enhancement of wildlife will be promoted where possible in both open land and the built up areas. The Council recognises the importance of conserving and enhancing established habitats through suitable protection and sympathetic management. A number of wildlife sites have been identified in the Borough and the Council will take measures to ensure that any protected species are not disturbed by development. When development is permitted, planning conditions or Section 106 agreements are likely to be imposed to safeguard and minimise disturbance for these species. Protected species are considered to be animals and plant species of community interest, in need of strict protection. Protected species are not listed here but are referred to in paragraph 47 of PPG 9 and listed in Annex G of PPG 9. Priority Species are defined locally, and listed in Ealing's Bio-diversity Action Plan.3.9-J1

  The Council will seek to promote the availability of and access to areas of nature conservation interest for all, taking care to avoid conflicts with species protection. Initiatives will be sought in areas deficient in such sites such as Acton, Park Royal, Southall and parts of Ealing, including habitat reconstruction. 3.9-J2
   
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Ealing Council Unitary Development Plan
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